Quarry Lane 18 & 19

Quarry Lane 18 & 19
Quarry Lane 18 & 19

 

My Grt. Grt. Grt Grandad was Thomas Mann who was married to Lucy Grattan. Their daughter Lucy was married to John Hackett, my grandmothers parents, Lily Hackett and Henry Burbidge all who lived a 18 and 19 Quarry lane.

These were Thomas Mann’s houses at 18 and 19 Quarry Lane where my grandma and grandad lived and where my father John Burbidge and his brothers Harry and Harold and sister Olive grew up.

The other photo is of Thomas Mann (known as Fatty Mann) and his wife and 3 of his children. He had the slaughter house at the back of the houses where he kept pigs. Unfortunately the houses were demolished by the council in 1971 To make way for the road to be widened!

 

 

Comments about this page

  • Hi Marlene, my late wife Barbara nee  Whitehurst  was Grace’s daughter, Lucy Hackett was her Grandma she kept in touch with Olive and Bill till Olive had to go into care. Sadly Barbara passed away on 20th of September 2014, her brothers Graham and Michael are still alive 

    By alwyne fryer (18/07/2015)
  • Hello Marlene and Sally, I was so sorry to hear that Olive had passed away, for we knew her very well, both as a little girl and young lady.   Olive, and probably the others, would all have known my sisters, Ina and Eileen. I believe Olive went to both the Moor Lane, and Rosemary Schools. I did enjoy talking to your Dad Marlene,  I will try to catch him again at the Salvation Army on my next visit to Mansfield, My word, he is doing well! He did remember my brother Barry when I spoke with him. Best wishes, Alan

    By alan curtis (01/12/2014)
  • Hi Sally, yes your grandma Grace was my grandmas sister. John and Lucy HAckett had 5 girls. Lilly, (my grandma),Lucy, Elsie, Grace and Jessie who indeed adopted Michael. My dad John Burbidge is now 94 and very well. Your dad will no doubt remember my Aunty Olive who unfortunately died earlier this year. Nice to hear from you.

    Marlene nee Burbidge

    29 Nov 2014

    By Marlene steudel (29/11/2014)
  • Hi Marlene, on my grandma and grandads wedding certificate of 1930 there addresses were 18 and 19 Quarry Lane! Grandads name was Charles Henry Whitehurst and grandmas name was Grace Hackett daughter of John Hackett. I never knew them as grandma died shortly after giving birth to my uncle Michael in 1945 and was adopted by grandmas sister. And grandad died 4 years before I was born in 1960. My dad Graham Whitehurst is age 82

    By Sally Nee Whitehurst (10/11/2014)
  • Hi Alan, it seems dad was indeed the one you spoke to at the Salvation Army and he’s sorry there wasn’t more time to talk as he enjoys talking about the old days. He remembers the name Curtis but not sure of the first names and he certainly remembers the sand quarry on the tippin particularly when his brother Harold fell in it and broke his arm.

    By Marlene (17/09/2014)
  • Hi Marlene, I just knew you were a Burbidge. Wow seeing the photographs of the two houses at the bottom of Sibthorpe Street that backed onto the tippin, brought back many memories of days gone by. It is also good to know that the mention of the slaughter house is living proof that the slaughter house I spoke of on previous pages was not a figment of my imagination. And thank goodness someone took pictures. I remember the slaughter house very well, and I also remember the pigs round the back, often wandering onto the tippin. Was it your father I spoke to when I visited the Salvation Army?  If so, and I believe it was, my family knew him very well, especially my brother Barry. Across the road of Quarry Lane, directly opposite 18/19, the only house built on that side of the road of Quarry Lane, lived my Aunt Florence and her better half Lawson Storey. I’m talking of the second half of the 1800’s, so I guess your ancestors knew one part of our family also very well. How interesting it is, the kind of ways people made a living, and the memorable characters that evolved, certainly in my, and your fathers younger lives. Lawson was the local chimney sweep, doubling up with being the Gamekeeper for the Duke of Portland. Fatty Man, never knew he lived there, I guess before the railways came to be it was all totally different. The bank called Fatty Man’s Bank  to me has always been there. Does your father remember when the tippin used to be a Sand Quarry?  Maybe the name Billy Brielly rings a bell.  Many thanks for the page. Alan

    By alan curtis (12/09/2014)

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